Before pattern pieces are joined up, they are usually blocked and pressed to ensure a good fit. It’s always a good idea to check the yarn band for any special instructions. The pieces are blocked when dry and are pressed with a damp cloth.


Blocking

Blocking

Garment pieces need blocking, or putting into shape before they can be joined up.

Cover a table with a folded blanket and a sheet. Using rustless pins, "block" the pieces wrong side out to the correct measurements.

Be careful not to stretch or distort the fabric and make sure that all the rows run in straight lines.

Pressing

Pressing

After blocking, the garment pieces are usually pressed in position. Use a warm iron and a damp cloth on wool. Lay the iron on the fabric and lift it up. Do not move it over the surface. Do not remove any of the pins until the work has cooled and dried completely.

Raised and embossed patterns should be pressed under a damp cloth, but remove the pins and adjust the fabric while it is still hot to avoid flattening the pattern.Do not press ribbing. Use a heavy cloth and remove the pins in order to adjust the fabric while it is still warm.

Weaving Yarn

This method should be used when you are work large pattern repeats for patterns requiring three or more colours, and when the yarn has to be carried over more than five stitches.

In A Knit Row

Waeving Yarn in a knit row

1. Hold yarn A in your right hand and yarn B in your left hand to the back of the work

Weaving Yarn in a knit row 2

2. Knit one stitch with yarn A and, at the same time, bring yarn B below yarn A. When yarn B is being used, weave yarn A as left.

In A Purl Row

Weaving Yarn in a purl row

1. Hold yarn A in your right hand and yarn B in your left hand to the front of the work.

Weaving yarn in a purl row 2

2. Purl one stitch with yarn A but this time bring yarn B below yarn A. When yarn B is being used, weave yarn A as left.

Checking Your Technique

Weaving Techniqu

Weaving

If you have worked weaving correctly, the yarns will cross evenly and remain at the same depth. A "smocking" effect means that you have pulled the yarns too tightly. It is better for the yarns to be woven too loosely than too tightly.

Stranding Technique

Stranding

If you have worked stranding correctly, the yarns will be running evenly across the back of the work at the same tension as the knitting. Puckering indicates that you have pulled the yarns too tightly.

Crossing Colours

Use this method for working large blocks of colour (eg diagonal or wide vertical stripes or jacquard motifs). When crossing colours each colour is kept as a separate ball or on a bobbin and is not taken across the work. Rather, the yarns are crossed at the join. Follow the instructions below for vertical colour patterns as well, but cross the colours on every row.

Crossing Colours

In a knit row for a diagonal stripe to the right.

Cross yarn A in front of yarn B and drop it to the back. Knit the first stitch on your left hand needle using yarn B. On the return row the yarns will automatically loop together.

Crossing Colours 2

In a purl row for a diagonal stripe to the left.

Pick up yarn B in front of yarn A and use it to purl the next stitch on your left hand needle. On the return row, the yarns will automatically