Use this method for working narrow stripes, small repeats of colour such as Fair Isle, and other patterns requiring only two colours in a row. Strand yarn over a maximum of five stitches only

Work in a new ball of yarn or another colour at the beginning of a row, if possible. With a new ball of yarn, the ends of both the old and the new yarn can then be darned neatly into the edge of the back of the work. When working with additional colours, the yarn can either be broken off and darned in, or carried up the side of the work until it is needed again.

When knitting with more than one colour, you will find it necessary to adopt various techniques to keep the back of the work neat and to prevent holes appearing. There are three basic methods of working: stranding, weaving and crossing. Stranding and weaving yarns produces a thicker fabric.

To prevent the different yarns getting tangled when weaving or stranding, the strands must be caught up in the back of the work, but it must be done in such a way that they do not interfere with the pattern or produce undesired effects such as tightening tension.

Winding Bobbins

To help keep different yarns separate when working complicated colour patterns, wind manageable lengths onto bobbins, yarn holders or spools. Replenish as necessary. Or, keep yarns in individual plastic bags secured at the "neck" with an elastic band.

Adding Yarn at the Beginning of a Row

knit10a

1. Insert your right hand needle through the first stitch on your left hand needle and wrap the old yarn, and then the new yarn over it. Knit (or purl) the stitch using both yarns.

knit10b

2. Leaving the old yarn at the back, knit (or purl) the next two stitches using the double length of the new yarn.

adding yarn at the beginning of a row 3

3. Discard the short end of the yarn and continue to knit as usual. On the following row, threat the three double stitches as single stitches.

Adding Yarn in the Middle of a Row

Adding yarn in the middle of a row

1. Insert your right hand needle through the first stitch on your left hand needle. Wrap the new yarn over, and knit (or purl) the stitch with the new yarn. Leave the old yarn at the back of the work.

Adding yarn in the middle of a row

2. Knit (or purl) the next two stitches using the double length of the new yarn.

Adding yarn in the middle of a row

3. Discard the short end of the new yarn and continue to knit as usual. On the following row, treat the two double stitches as single stitches.

Stranding Yarn

Use this method for working narrow stripes, small repeats of colour such as Fair Isle, and other patterns requiring only two colours in a row. Strand yarn over a maximum of five stitches only

Stranding yarn

In a knit row

With both yarns at the back of the work, knit the required number of stitches with yarn A (in this case two), and then drop it to the back. Pick up yarn B and knit the required number of stitches and then drop it to the back. Both yarns should be stranded loosely along the back of the work.

stranding yarn

In a purl row

With both yarns at the front of the work, purl the required number of stitches with yarn A (in this case two), and then drop it. Pick up yarn B and purl the required number of stitches and then drop it. Both yarns should be stranded loosely along the front (side facing you).